Tag Archives: crochet leaves

The finished motif choker.

Using MOD Zhurnal Motifs to make Jewellery

I gave MOD Zhurnal a try and last week, the magazines arrived in the post! I got the two all-crochet issues, No. 533 and No. 524.

My new Russian-language crochet fashion magazines.

My new Russian-language crochet fashion magazines: MOD Zhurnal 524 and 533, and Duplet 124.

The MOD Zhurnal magazines are rather different from the Duplet magazines. While the colour model photos in Duplet are not accompanied by the actual patterns for making them, the MOD Zhurnal models have patterns. However, one must bear in mind that the patterns are in Russian language and in crochet symbols.

To show you how the MOD Zhurnal models and patterns are presented in the magazines, I will provide here one example.

Here is model no. 4 from MOD Zhurnal 533.

Model no. 4 from MOD Zhurnal 533.

Model no. 4 from MOD Zhurnal 533.

And here (below) is a snapshot of the pattern for the modelled top. I have edited this image so that the texts and charts from the other models are not shown on the page. This will make the patterns less confusing.

Pattern instructions, charts and schematics for model no.4.

Pattern instructions, charts and schematics for model no.4.

The above pattern includes the written instructions (in Russian language), the symbol crochet chart for the motifs, and a schematic showing the measurements for the top (left, right from and back sections) and the sleeves.

If you don’t read Russian, you will have to rely mostly on the photos and crochet symbols charts and schematics to make this top. You should be able to crochet the motifs and have some knowledge and experience of joining the motifs together with crochet netting.

Often, I use the motifs in Duplet and MOD Zhurnal for making my own designs of clothes and accessories. Here is an example where I used the motifs shown above to make a choker. It is a fairly simple appropriation of the motifs.

The choker is tied at the back with simple crochet chain with beads.

The choker is tied at the back with simple crocheted string with beads.

I finished this choker in one evening. I used a crochet hook size 1mm and dk weight baby camel yarn. The motifs consists of: (1) large lacy leaf, (2) small lacy leaf, (3) normal leaf, (4) large flower with curled and flat petals, (5) small flower with curled petals.

Here is another view of the choker showing the motifs and their arrangement (below). As you can see, there are two large lacy leaves, two normal leaves, one large flower and one small flower. Plus a chain with beads for ties.

Here is how I arranged the motifs together to form the choker. Experiment with other arrangements.

Here is how I arranged the motifs together to form the choker. Experiment with other arrangements.

To read the crochet symbols, you must become familiar with what the individual symbols stand for. Refer to this chart from Duplet magazine, and a previous blog post, Learning to Read Crochet Symbols the Duplet Way.

Luckily, some of the models in MOD Zhurnal magazine are accompanied by detailed photographic step-by-step. For example, the same MOD Zhurnal 533 include a netting join tutorial of this beautiful dress designed and created by Olga Krivenko.

Modifications

Did I make any modifications to the patterns in the magazine?

Yes, but only very minor ones. I omitted the dc’s for the stem nearest to the lacy leaf so there is a small hole there. I prefer this to a solid stem.

The finished motif choker.

The finished motif choker.

Anyway, I am very happy with this new piece of crochet jewellery and there are many more motifs and inspiration from MOD Zhurnal.

If you would like to make this crochet jewellery using a written version of this pattern, just let me know so I can try and write down the pattern. Nevertheless, I consider it best for crocheters to start reading both written and symbol patterns and to get right into modifying as the first step to making your own designs.

This hairband is made from baby camel yarn.

A Baby Camel Hairband

Here is another hairband made from a hat pattern. The pattern I selected resembles the interlocking shell stitch pattern. This is also a pattern with a decrease by reducing the number of shells in the row. In the previous hairband project, I selected a shell decrease that reduced the number of stitches in each shell.

This hairband is made from baby camel yarn.

This hairband is made from baby camel yarn.


Hairband in Baby Camel yarn (US$15 including shipping) SOLD

The yarn made from baby camel hair is considered among the softest fibres and is used in luxury textiles because of its beautiful qualities and its scarcity. I can make this hairband for you. Please provide the head circumference, measuring snugly around the head as it is to be worn shown in the photograph above. The headband is made slightly smaller than the measurement you provide to allow for some stretching over use.


Methods of increasing and decreasing are important in crocheting. It certainly seems that one can crochet any shape with good methods of increasing and decreasing.

The finished hairband tapers at the top.

The finished hairband tapers at the top. Grape motif is sewn on one side.

Here is the flat view of the hairband (photo above). Like the first hairband, this one tapers near the top. I like this shape because it hold very well around my head. This also means I don’t need an elastic or ties or other means to tighten the hairband and keep it in place.

I decided to decorate the hairband this time. I used natural brown baby camel yarn for this and I thought that the light colour will make the crocheted decorations more visible but not too glaring. I made leaves and berries, sewed them together with silk camel thread and then sewed it onto the hairband with the same yarn that I used for the hairband.

The pattern for the leaves and berries are as follows:

Berries (make 8 and sew together to form grape bunch shape):

Make a magic circle (see embedded video below for tutorial from “Crochet Geek” on how to make this).
10 sc in circle, sl st on first sc to join. Ch 1, 10 sc over the first row of sc’s just made. Sl st in first sc to join. Fasten off.

Leaves (make 3):

Ch 12.
Row 1: Sc in 2nd ch fr hook (this would be the tip of the leaf) and in each ch across (11 sc made). Two more sc in last ch so that you turn to the other side of the foundation chain. Sc in each of next 8 ch. Ch 1, turn.

Row 2: Back loop Sc in next 9 sc, 3 sc in next sc (this would be the middle sc at the base of the leaf). Sc in each of next 9 sc along other side of leaf. Ch 1, turn.

Row 3: Back loop Sc in each of next 10 sc, 3 sc in next sc, back loop sc in each of next 8 sc. Ch 1, turn.

Row 4: Rep row 2.

Row 5: Rep row 3.

Row 6: Rep row 2. Fasten off.

And finally, here is the schematic for the interlocking shell stitch (with decrease). The hairband I made measures approximately 3 inches wide with 10 pattern repeats plus one extra row of shells added separately along the rim.

Schematic fo another version of the interlocking shell stitch.

Schematic fo another version of the interlocking shell stitch.

Here (written pattern below) is what I did to modify the hat pattern above. It is not much, but it does take a bit of modification to turn the pattern into a suitable pattern for the hairband. Don’t be afraid to modify patterns that you see so that you can adopt them to your design needs.


Interlocking Shell:

Ch a multiple of 8 sts.
(Tip: If you are unsure of the circumference and number of stitches to make, begin with a base chain longer than the standard head circumference. As you make the first row of shells, you will have a better idea of how long the base should be. Fit and check. When sure, you can easily unravel the extra chains made and then needle join the ends to continue making into a round.)

Rnd 1:
Ch 1, sc in 2nd ch fr hook, *ch 1, sk next 3 ch, in next ch make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk 3 ch, sc in next ch (shell made). Rep from * all around ending the last rep with sl st in first sc to join.

Rnd 2:
Ch 3, keeping last loop of each st on hook, make 3 dc in same sc, yo and pull through all loops on hook. Ch 3, sc in ch sp between first shell, *ch 3, keeping last loop of each st on hook, make 4 dc in next sc, yo and pull through all loops on hook (4-dc cluster made), ch 3, sc in next ch sp between next shell. Rep fr * all around ending the last rep with sl st in top of first ch-3 to join.

Rnd 3: Ch 4 (count as 1 dc, ch 1), 3 dc in same sc, ch 1, sk 3-ch, sc in next sc, *ch 1, sk 3-ch, in top of next 4-dc cluster make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk 3-ch, sc in next sc (shell made). Rep fr * all around ending with sl st in top of first dc to join.

Rnd 4:
Ch 1, sc in ch-1 sp bet first shell, ch 3, *4-dc cluster in next sc, ch 3, sc in ch sp between next shell, ch 3, rep fr ending the last rep with sl st in first sc to join.

Rnd 5: Ch 1, sc same st, *ch 1, sk next 3 ch, in top of next cluster make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk 3 ch, sc in next sc (shell made). Rep from * all around ending the last rep with sl st in first sc to join.

Rnd 6:
Rep rnd 2. (Making clusters)

Rnd 7: (Shell decrease row starts here) Ch 1, sc in same st, *ch 1, sk ch-3 sp and sc, in next ch-3 sp make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk cluster and next ch-3 sp, sc in next sc bet shell, ch 1, sk next ch-3 sp, in top of next cluster make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk next ch-3 sp, sc in next sc bet shell, ch 1, sk next ch-3 sp and cluster, in next ch-3 sp make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk next ch-3 sp, sc in top of next cluster, ch 1, sk next ch-3 sp, in next sc bet shell make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk next ch-3 sp, sc in top of next cluster, rep fr * all around ending last shell with sl st in first sc to join.

Rnd 8: Rep rnd 2. (Making clusters)

Rnd 9:
Rep rnd 3. (Making shells). Fasten off.

Now working along foundation chain of the hairband, join yarn with sc to a ch next to sc between the shells. Ch 1, sk 3 ch, in next ch where shell in first row is made, make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk next 3 ch, sc in next ch, ch 1, *sk 3 ch, in next ch make (3 dc, ch 1, 3 dc), ch 1, sk next 3 ch, sc in next ch, ch 1, rep fr * all around ending with sl st in first sc to join. Fasten off.


When you make your hairband, keep the circumference short by maybe about 0.5 inch. Yarn stretches so if you crochet exactly the circumference of your head, you may end up with a loose hairband. Take note also of how narrow the hairband tapers. If it is too short and narrow, it won’t fit at all up to your forehead because you have nearly closed off the top opening. Remember the pattern is really for a hat and we’re just using the pattern to make a nice fitting hairband! :)

Happy crocheting! :)

Making the Magic Circle (or Magic Ring)
A magic ring is a way to begin crocheting in the round by crocheting over an adjustable loop and then pulling the loop tight.